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Do the Little Things Matter?

Linked by Paul Ciano on February 5, 2018

Daniel Pocock:

…our failure to take care of little decisions, like how we choose an email provider, may be the reason those big projects, like privacy or diversity, appear to be no more than a pie-in-the-sky.

Google’s CEO Eric Schmidt tells us that if you don’t have anything to hide, you don’t need to worry.

Compare this to the advice of Sun Tzu, author of the indispensable book on strategy, The Art of War. The very first chapter is dedicated to estimating, calculating and planning: what we might call data science today. Tzu unambiguously advises to deceive your opponent, not to let him know the truth about your strengths and weaknesses.

In the third chapter, Offense, Tzu starts out that The best policy is to take a state intact … to subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence. Surely this is only possible in theory and not in the real world? Yet when I speak to a group of people new to free software and they tell me “everybody uses Windows in our country”, Tzu’s words take on meaning he never could have imagined 2,500 years ago.

…just as Admiral McRaven’s Navy SEALS are conditioned to make their bed every day at boot camp, people entering IT, especially those from under-represented groups, need to take pride in small victories for privacy and security, like saying “No” each and every time they have the choice to give up some privacy and get something “free”, before they will ever hope to accomplish big projects and change the world.

If they don’t learn these lessons at the outset, like the survival and success habits drilled into soldiers during boot-camp, will they ever? If programs just concentrate on some “job skills” and gloss over the questions of privacy and survival in the information age, how can they ever deliver the power shift that is necessary for diversity to mean something?

Paul Ciano

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